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Vol 8 - Issue 1

Art and Science


List of Articles

The Querulous Hermann Fol (1845-1892): His Scientific Work, Art, and Inventions
John R. Dolan

Hermann Fol was a very accomplished Swiss naturalist of the late 19th century, but today is largely forgotten. He was a student of the notable biologists Édouard Claparède and Ernst Haeckel, and like them, specialized in the study of marine organisms. Fol is known only among embryologists for his description of fertilization in echinoderms. In reality, his work ranged well beyond such studies to encompass diverse taxa of the marine plankton, illustrated with remarkable scientific artwork, and included designing various scientific devices. Fol worked on human embryology, light penetration in seawater, methods of reducing microbial contamination of drinking water, and development of a rabies vaccine. His career was marked by a long series of disputes with contemporary naturalists and was relatively short, ending at age 47 with a mysterious disappearance. Here I provide a review of his contentious life, his scientific work, his scientific art, his scientific inventions, and his role in establishing Villefranche-sur-Mer as a center of marine science. The life and work of Hermann Fol is shown to be an example of the very wide-ranging activities of 19th century naturalists, and the apparent dangers of an over-sized ego.


Genius loci : digging to reveal ? Art and Archaeology, the example of Terra Amata
Charlotte Pringuey-Cessac, Bertrand Roussel

Is the approach of the scientist, in this case, the archaeologist, and that of the artist when they discover a prehistoric site, truly so distant? To comprehend a space, it is necessary to gauge what already exists. If this element serves as a clue for the archaeologist, how is it perceived by the artist attempting to understand it? Visual artist Charlotte Pringuey-Cessac and prehistorian Bertrand Roussel discuss their respective approaches to the Terra Amata site, within the framework of an exhibition they presented from December 6, 2019, to May 17, 2020, titled "Bruit originaire" (Original Noise). Even if the origin of humanity is probably forever concealed from us, it does not prevent us from wanting to approach it. It seems that there is a similar and shared intention between the artist’s practice and that of the prehistorian. Whether in the artist’s intention or the archaeologist’s, the idea of promise persists in the very practice of each.

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2023

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2022

Volume 22- 6

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2021

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2020

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2019

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2018

Volume 18- 2

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2017

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